caribou_gen: (Default)
I'm just trying to make my rtw trip more concrete and figure out things like visas and shots. This is the list of countries I plan to visit:

China
India
Malaysia
Australia
New Zealand
Kenya
Tanzania
Malawi
Mozambique
Zimbabwe
Botswana
Namibia
South Africa
England
France
Netherlands
Germany
Switzerland
Maybe a couple other countries in Europe...

Doesn't seem too shabby. There are only six countries on the list that I have visited in the past, but not necessarily in much detail. The European portion is the least planned out section of my trip so far. I'll have to give it some more thought once I have the immediate travel concerns sorted out (first thing is to get my Indian and Chinese visas).

Yarn Arts

Mar. 23rd, 2011 09:08 pm
caribou_gen: (Default)
I'm a little astonished at how things are going with my turtle-paced crochet and knitting project. Despite my sad and slow attempts to create something usable with yarn, I have now:

- organized a knitting/crocheting get together at the Muttart through Ravelry; we'll see if it becomes a regular event
- gotten a few students excited about playing with string during a lunch hour once a week starting after Spring Break

Hopefully this will help keep me motivated in my projects (and surround myself with people who likely know way more than I do).

On an aside, only a couple more teaching days before Spring Break. Sadly, I'm once again drowning in marking. On the upside, it is better to get the marking now instead of in June!
caribou_gen: (Default)
Many of you know I'll be the Foods teacher this year at my school. Now I enjoy cooking and baking, but I've never been formally taught it myself (Home Economics was never offered at any school I attended).

my students: generally low to middle class, considered at-risk, some struggling to live on own

my kitchen: pretty small, no fan, will probably fit 5-6 youth at a time BUT I have a food mixer and a food processor and an oven/stove along with maybe a few other nifty items

my class: I'm holding it every Thursday for 3 hours; the youth will need to attend at least two to three classes in order to earn a high school credit; the bonus is that they get to eat for lunch whatever they cook

my ideas: I'm considering a few themed classes along the line of holidays or nationalities, but mostly I want to focus on nutrition and affordability

What fabulous recipes or dishes do you think these youth should learn or would like to learn? So far, a few of my ideas include crepes (savory and dessert), quiche, pizza, homemade pasta, taco salad, sushi, chicken caesar salad, fajita, hummus, lasagna, bannock, chili with cornbread (although I could use a good tried and true recipe for both)...
caribou_gen: (Default)
My friend, Robin, has created a website about the mysterious circumstances regarding her brother's death last year. Please have a look at the website and consider signing the petition to encourage that John's death gets a proper investigation:

http://www.justice4john.com/

If you are moved by the story, please do pass it along. The family could use all the help they can get.
caribou_gen: (Default)
I just tried making this. As it sets in the fridge, the results are currently unknown. I have a mix of curiosity, excitement and revulsion welling up inside me. If the results are good (or perhaps even if they are bad), I'll be sharing in the very near future.

edit:

SUCCESS! If you like Vietnamese coffee, you'll likely love this coffee gelatin.
caribou_gen: (Default)
This video just makes me smile every time I watch it. The song is pretty catchy, too!



They are the same chaps that did the treadmill video here:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dTAAsCNK7RA
caribou_gen: (Default)
If you are a fan of graphic novels, picture books and early film, I recommend running to the library or the book store to pick up Brian Selznick's beautiful book, The Invention of Hugo Cabret. With gorgeous illustrations interwoven with film and text, it slowly unfolds a charming, mysterious story of 12 year old orphan, clock keeper and thief, Hugo, who lives within the walls of a Paris train station.

I won't write much more about it as it's more of a delight to discover this masterpiece yourself in its unusual format. Happy reading!
caribou_gen: (Default)
1/2 cup margarine
1/2 cup vegetable oil
1 3/4 cups sugar
2 eggs
1 tsp vanilla
1/2 cup sour milk
2 1/2 cups flour
4 tbsp cocoa
1 tsp soda
1/2 tsp baking powder
1/2 tsp salt
1/2 tsp cinnamon
2 cups zucchini, peeled and chopped (I grate it with the skin instead)

Toppings:
1/4 cup chocolate chips
1/4 cup brown sugar (this is all I use)
1/4 cup chopped nuts

Cream shortening and sugar. Add eggs and vanilla. Beat. Sift dry ingredients together. Add alternately with sour milk. Mix in zucchini. Turn into greased 9x13 inch pan. Bake at 325F for 40-45 minutes or until done. Spread with topping while cake is still warm. Yield: 16 servings.

This recipe is from a Knights of Columbus cookbook called, I think, Our Daily Bread - I just have a photocopy if this one page. The people who contributed this recipe were Dorothy and Leo de Champlain, Emily and Alex Nimco from Edmonton (Members of St. Joseph Assembly).

Natto

Aug. 5th, 2009 04:26 pm
caribou_gen: (Default)
I discovered that I can buy frozen natto at the T&T Market, and so I've been enjoying it as a snack lately. It is fermented soybeans and looks a lot like lumpy mucas that has a strong cheesy smell. In Japan, it tends to be one of those foods that the Japanese people test on foreigners to see what reaction they'll get. I developed a taste for it so I wouldn't be one of those who "failed" the test.

It is a popular food in Hokkaido and everyone I talked with there claimed it was really healthy for you. I just looked at my translated label and discovered the following is in each serving:

Fiber 12g (48% of daily req)
Protein 8g

That's pretty impressive. I think I'll continue to seek it out every chance I get. I wonder how that compares with edamame (regular ol' soybeans)?
caribou_gen: (Default)
If you haven't seen Wendy McNeill in concert, jump at the chance. She's delightful.

caribou_gen: (Default)
I heard this on the radio the other day, and thought I'd gift it upon you. Laura Barrett is a Canadian singer that I may try to seek out in the future.



Beware of robot ponies.

Christmas

Dec. 14th, 2008 07:08 pm
caribou_gen: (Default)
I found what I want for Christmas. I suspect, though, that Santa won't be delivering it to me this year:

http://www.signaturehardware.com/product3707

My mind boggles at its very existance.

(I suspect, though, that this would be a better gift. I had one in my Japanese apartment and loved it.)
caribou_gen: (Default)
I'm actually going to be seeing David Byrne in concert in February!

Have a listen here a wonderful streaming version of his latest album that he created with Brian Eno:

http://www.everythingthathappens.com/
caribou_gen: (Default)
The Net Zero house is having another open house:

Next Public Open House: Saturday, October 04
Where: at the house, 9926 87 Street
Time: open 11:00am to 4:00pm
Duration: it would take 1 hour+ to see everything well
Cost: free; Registration: not needed
Format: open house: come, stay and go as you please

More information is at http://www.riverdalenetzero.ca/.

The Edmonton Journal also has an article today about the homes - apparently they are going to be sold for $700,000 each (the land itself cost $300,000).
caribou_gen: (Default)
Boule loaf from last night's dough - a success! Two loaves made. One consumed with Mort and Jillybean and one given to a man of the mouse variety.

More opportunities to make and consume bread in the near future, possibly coming to a house near you.
caribou_gen: (Default)
In my search for new, odd adventures, I've decided to try to learn more about baking bread. I've enlisted the help of a couple of different resources:

[livejournal.com profile] buhrger - it was a wee while ago that I moseyed over to his house to assist him. What I mostly remember is "Holy mother of hugeness, Batman! That's a giant mixing bowl and that's a whole lotta dough."

The Tassajara Bread Book - I've made the basic yeasted whole wheat bread recipe so far. It involves a whole lotta waiting and kneading and punching and more waiting. The loaf turned out lovely and dense, but I was blown away by how long it took to make a couple of loaves. No wonder [livejournal.com profile] buhrger makes such vast quantities at a time!

Artisan Bread in Five Minutes a Day - I first heard about this on CBC - bread that involves no kneading, very little time commitment, and can survive in your fridge for up to two weeks. Sounds pretty intriguing so I picked it up and, tonight, I've made the dough and hopefully tomorrow I'll get a chance to bake it up for dinner.

I think I may need to eventually start doing doing drive-by bread drops if this continues. There is only so much bread I can eat on my own!
caribou_gen: (Default)
About a year ago, I became a microlender to people in developing countries through an organization called Kiva. I was a little bit hesitant that it would turn out to be a scam or that the organization would fall apart, but I've been very, very happy with it so far. Since I joined up and started lending money, Bill Clinton included information about the organization in his book, Giving and various newspapers, magazines and T.V. shows have carried stories about it.

To date, I've started 17 loans:
9 have been paid back in full
5 are being actively paid back - money is just re-invested into new loans
2 have the money raised but it hasn't been distributed to the entrepreneur
1 is still fundraising
0 loans have defaulted

I'm absolutely loving it. Over the year, I've received about three updates from various people to whom I've lent money; this is always such a gift. I really enjoy the process of picking a new person or a new group of people when I've got got money to re-invest (I often choose Cambodia as the poverty there struck a chord in me when I visited the country in 2003). It boggles me a little that it can be this easy to make such a huge impact for someone else.

Would I recommend it to others? In a heartbeat.
caribou_gen: (Default)
*waves*

I'm alive. Can't stay online very long as the dial-up is on the same line as the phone. Beautiful place. Ranch is at the bottom of a valley. Riding two or more times a day; formal riding lessons will start in about a week after I'm more comfortable with the trails and the horses. It's rustic but gorgeous. Birds are everywhere - there is never a time when the air isn't filled with song.

Don't know when I'll be online again. Hope everyone else is doing well!
Page generated Jun. 29th, 2017 01:52 am
Powered by Dreamwidth Studios